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I haven’t posted shit in forever, so……

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Marshall’s blowout sale!

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fuckyeahh1980s:

Rakim:
Although he never became a household name  outside of Hip Hop circles, Rakim is almost universally acknowledged as  one of the greatest MCs of all time. It isn’t necessarily the substance  of what he says that’s helped him win numerous polls among rap fans in  the know; the majority of his lyrics concern his own skills and his  Islamic faith, instead it is the way he says it, and this is where Rakim  is virtually unparalleled, even to this day. 
His flow is smooth and  effortless with jazz rhythms that makes it sound as though he’s not even  breaking a sweat. Rakim raised the bar for MC technique higher than it  had ever been, helping to pioneer the use of internal rhymes — rhymes  that occurred in the middle of lines rather than just at the end. Many  MCs of Rakim’s time developed their technique through ‘off the top of  the head’ freestyle battles, were as Rakim was among the first to  demonstrate the possibilities of sitting down and writing intricately  crafted lyrics.

fuckyeahh1980s:

Rakim:

Although he never became a household name outside of Hip Hop circles, Rakim is almost universally acknowledged as one of the greatest MCs of all time. It isn’t necessarily the substance of what he says that’s helped him win numerous polls among rap fans in the know; the majority of his lyrics concern his own skills and his Islamic faith, instead it is the way he says it, and this is where Rakim is virtually unparalleled, even to this day.

His flow is smooth and effortless with jazz rhythms that makes it sound as though he’s not even breaking a sweat. Rakim raised the bar for MC technique higher than it had ever been, helping to pioneer the use of internal rhymes — rhymes that occurred in the middle of lines rather than just at the end. Many MCs of Rakim’s time developed their technique through ‘off the top of the head’ freestyle battles, were as Rakim was among the first to demonstrate the possibilities of sitting down and writing intricately crafted lyrics.

(via oppositeoffaith)

Source: fuckyeahh1980s
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The New Yorker: Whose Police?

Among the most effective chants of the O.W.S. protesters has been a simple message: “The whole world is watching.” The chant is powerful because it is true. This is the age of the smartphone and the live-feed. And so, in New York on Monday night—or rather, at one o’clock on Tuesday morning—when Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly deployed thousands of cops to clear O.W.S. out of Zuccotti Park, they did so under the deepest cover of darkness, and they forbade the press from seeing what they were doing.

The N.Y.P.D. descended on the park with deafening military-grade LRAD noise canons and several stadiums’ worth of blinding Klieg lights, and while they worked, they drove journalists steadily back further and further from their area of operations. (Even the airspace over southern Manhattan was closed during the raid to prevent news helicopters from filming, making a mockery of claims, by the mayor and the police, that they were keeping reporters at bay for their own safety.) A number of journalists who attempted to stand their ground, identifying themselves to the police and insisting on their long-established legal right to work, were treated like protesters—roughed up, shoved, put in choke holds, pepper-sprayed, and otherwise manhandled, and at least seven reporters (including four who’d sought refuge in a church, and one from the New York Post, which has been calling for such a police operation against O.W.S. for weeks) were among the nearly two hundred and fifty people arrested during the crackdown. So was a City Councilman, Ydanis Rodriguez, who was taken into custody blocks from the park, and bloodied in the process.

The paramilitary-style eviction of O.W.S. from Zuccotti park was not our Guernica; it wasn’t our Tiananmen Square, nor even our Tahrir Square—as Nicholas Kristof of the Times, and many other commentators not so firmly in the media mainstream, have suggested. Thankfully, the Occupy encampments across America, and the state power arrayed against them did not represent anything like the forces of revolution or of oppression that we’ve seen in those foreign uprisings. That is precisely what makes the police violence that has become such a common spectacle so troubling: protest is an essential American democratic tradition, and you don’t have to support the protesters (or oppose the dismantling of their camps) to condemn its forcible stifling.

Of course there have been piecemeal incidents of violent criminality (vandalism and assault) by protesters; and, in confrontations with police, some have fought back. But the conduct of the overwhelming majority of Occupy activists has been highly disciplined in its adherence to the rigors of nonviolent civil disobedience. So why have we had to watch police—who are our employees, operating in our name— slamming and dragging unresisting men on the street, kneeling heavily on people’s heads while binding their wrists too tightly in flexicuffs, and pepper-spraying already captive women in New York; billy-clubbing peaceable demonstrators and dragging them brutally around by their hair when they offer their wrists to be arrested in Berkeley; and tear-gassing and flash-banging them at Occupy Oakland? []

In a democracy, a mayor who believes he can shut down the press at will is not defending public safety; and a mayor who believes the police can be unleashed to manhandle the citizenry without answering for it cannot claim to be on the side of law or order.

(via thatshellafierce)

Source: kateoplis
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84-year-old woman pepper sprayed by Seattle police at Occupy Seattle.

I know opinions vary about the Occupy Movement, and I respect everyone’s right to hold their own beliefs. However, it’s hard to find any justification for the pepper spraying of an 84-year-old woman essentially for the crime of unlawful gathering. I understand some businesses may suffer from the movements, and I also know a small percentage of protestors vandalize, so I do understand why some of you may not agree with the Occupy movement.

But, we’re talking a movement of hundreds of thousands across the country, the vast majority who protest peacefully. Is pepper spraying old women and beating UC college students the answer to unlawful gathering? Meanwhile, Penn State students tip over cars and start fires, and it gets labeled a “rally.” Challenge yourselves, put aside your political beliefs, and ask yourself, is force - the kind of force that has already lead to extreme injuries - by police the correct response for Americans who are committing minor crimes?

Please, reblog this. I really want people to consider why this is all happening.

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Perhaps the greatest C in the history of basketball, Bill Russell pulled down 49 rebounds against Philadelphia on Nov 16, 1957.

Perhaps the greatest C in the history of basketball, Bill Russell pulled down 49 rebounds against Philadelphia on Nov 16, 1957.

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callmednice:

Naughty By Nature, 2011 • @NaughtyByNature @TriggerTreach

Source: callmednice
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CHEPH
AJ ROF

CHEPH
AJ ROF